NAP – Network Access Protection | Technet

Network Access Protection
Network Access Protection (NAP) is a policy enforcement platform built into Microsoft Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 (now in beta testing) that allows you to better protect your private network by enforcing compliance with computer health requirements. For example, a firewall must be installed and enabled and the latest operating system updates must be installed. With NAP, you can create customized health requirement policies to validate computer health before allowing network access or communication, automatically update compliant computers to ensure ongoing compliance, and optionally confine noncompliant computers to a restricted network until they become compliant.

Introduction to Network Access Protection
Read this white paper for an overview of NAP scenarios and components and a brief description of how NAP works for Internet Protocol security (IPsec)-protected communication, 802.1X authenticated connections, remote access virtual private network (VPN) connections, and Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) configuration. For a WebCast version of this white paper, click here.

Network Access Protection Platform Architecture
Read this white paper for a detailed description of the components of the NAP architecture, how it works, and how it allows third-party software vendors and system integrators to create complete solutions for system health validated network access. For a WebCast version of this white paper, click here.

Internet Protocol Security Enforcement in the Network Access Protection Platform
Read this white paper for a detailed description of how IPsec enforcement in the Network Access Protection platform works to provide system health validation and enforcement for IPsec-protected communication.

Network Access Protection Platform Overview
Read the Cable Guy article for July 2005 for an overview of NAP capabilities and architecture and a comparison of NAP with Network Access Quarantine Control in Windows Server 2003.

Network Access Protection Policies in Windows Server 2008
Read this white paper for a description of the different settings of the Network Policy Server (NPS) service for NAP and how the different settings are related to create a customized health determination and enforcement solution.

IEEE 802.1X for Wired Networks and Internet Protocol Security with Microsoft Windows
Read this white paper to learn about the security and capabilities of 802.1X for wired networks and IPsec and their support in Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP.

Step-by-Step Guides
Step-by-Step Guide: Demonstrate IPsec NAP Enforcement in a Test Lab 
Step-by-Step Guide: Demonstrate 802.1X NAP Enforcement in a Test Lab 
Step-by-Step Guide: Demonstrate VPN NAP Enforcement in a Test Lab 
Step-by-Step Guide: Demonstrate DHCP NAP Enforcement in a Test Lab 

TechNet Virtual Labs
Network Access Protection with IPSec Enforcement
Complete this TechNet virtual lab to review NAP health certificates, verify connectivity between compliant NAP clients, and demonstrate network restriction of a noncompliant NAP client.

Microsoft NAP – Cisco NAC Interoperability
Cisco and Microsoft Unveil Joint Architecture for NAC-NAP Interoperability
Read this press release for information about the joint architecture that will enable customers and partners to deploy interoperable Cisco Network Admission Control (NAC) and Microsoft NAP.

Cisco Network Admission Control and Microsoft Network Access Protection Interoperability Architecture
Read this white paper for further details of the interoperability architecture that allows customers to deploy both Cisco NAC and Microsoft NAP.
Microsoft NAP – Trusted Computing Group TNC Interoperability

Standardizing Network Access Control: TNC and Microsoft NAP to Interoperate
Read this white paper for information about how Trusted Computing Group Trusted Network Connect (TNC) and Microsoft NAP will interoperate.
Partners

Network Access Protection Partners

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